What You Gonna Do When the World’s on Fire?

A film by Rober­to Miner­vi­ni. In Eng­lish with Ger­man sub­tit­les.

[Credits] [Tickets & Ter­mi­ne] [Trai­ler]

Shot in lumin­ous black and white, the latest from Rober­to Miner­vi­ni (The Other Side) del­ves into the ever­y­day lives of Black Ame­ri­cans figh­t­ing for jus­ti­ce and sur­vi­val in the sum­mer of 2017, wea­ving mas­ter­ful­ly bet­ween four wren­ching sto­ry­lines in New Orleans and Jack­son Coun­ty, Mis­sis­sip­pi.

Throughout his care­er the Ita­li­an-born, Texas-based Rober­to Miner­vi­ni (The Other Side, Wav­elengths ’15) has estab­lis­hed a pro­vo­ca­ti­ve cine­ma­tic style and mode of pro­duc­tion, immer­sing hims­elf in the com­mu­nities in which he works. The results are often reve­la­to­ry in the most lite­ral sen­se, yiel­ding unf­or­gett­able and vis­ceral moving images of rare­ly seen lives on the mar­gins.

Minervini’s fifth fea­ture, What You Gon­na Do When the World’s on Fire?, is cer­tain to be one of the year’s most tal­ked-about films. Shot in lumin­ous black and white, the film del­ves into the ever­y­day lives of Black Ame­ri­cans figh­t­ing for jus­ti­ce and sur­vi­val in the sum­mer of 2017, shif­ting mas­ter­ful­ly bet­ween four wren­ching sto­ry­lines in New Orleans and Jack­son Coun­ty, Mis­sis­sip­pi.

The film obser­ves Judy Hill, who stri­ves to keep her fami­ly and friends afloat (finan­cial­ly, as much as emo­tio­nal­ly) as her bar is threa­tened; the two young bro­thers Ronal­do and Titus, who­se neigh­bour­hood is plagued by vio­lence; Kevin, the Big Chief of the Indian tra­di­ti­on of Mar­di Gras, who is kee­ping the cul­tu­ral heri­ta­ge of his peop­le ali­ve; and The New Black Pan­thers, who car­ry out a door-to-door people’s inves­ti­ga­ti­on of a kil­ling attri­bu­t­ed to the Ku Klux Klan.

A film of urgen­cy, com­mu­ni­ty, righ­te­ous anger, and grace, it is impos­si­ble to be unaf­fec­ted by the peop­le encoun­te­red in What You Gon­na Do. With start­ling inti­ma­cy, seam­less pro­xi­mi­ty, and a skil­ful struc­tu­ral design, Minervini’s por­traits coale­sce into a power­ful indict­ment of white supre­ma­cy in the Ame­ri­can South, and a moving tes­ta­ment to human digni­ty, empa­thy, and resi­li­en­ce.

ANDRÉA PICARD

 
Credits:

Italien/USA/Frankreich 2018, 123 Min., eng­li­sche OmU, schwarz-weiß
Regie, Dreh­buch: Rober­to Miner­vi­ni
Kame­ra: Die­go Rome­ro
Schnitt: Marie-Hélè­ne Dozo

 
Trai­ler:

nach oben