Wind River

A film by Taylor Sheridan. In eng­lish with ger­man subtitles.

A blank spot on the map, rug­ged and relent­less. The win­ters here in Wyoming are espe­cial­ly tough, with tem­pe­ra­tures going down to the minus dou­ble digits. When you run out­side in the wil­der­ness, your lungs might burst. That‘s what see­med to have hap­pen­ed to a young woman who is dis­co­ve­r­ed in the snow by hun­ter and tra­cker Cory Lambert. Her body isn‘t just lying any­whe­re, but on the edge of the Arapaho and Shoshone Native American reser­va­ti­on Wind River and the vic­tim is also Arapaho. That makes the case unim­portant to the sta­te poli­ce. The Native American aut­ho­ri­ties should deal with it. Young FBI agent Jane Banner is sent the­re from her trai­ning site in Las Vegas 800 kilo­me­ters away. It starts out as a for­ma­li­ty, but the more she founds out about the con­di­ti­ons on the reser­va­ti­on, the more she feels it is her duty to sol­ve the case. With the help of Cory who is more invol­ved in the case than she first thinks, she sear­ches for traces to find out what hap­pen­ed that night.

In the Native American reser­va­ti­on count­less young woman die and disap­pe­ar every day and their cases remain unsol­ved. Taylor Sheridan, the pri­ze-win­ning screen­wri­ter of films like SICARIO and HELL OR HIGH WATER, dedi­ca­tes his direc­to­ri­al debut to them. WIND RIVER is a devas­ta­ting stu­dy in loss, a keen­ly obser­ved socio­gram, and a ner­ve-racking thril­ler. The indie film is car­ri­ed by Jeremy Renner‘s sen­si­ti­ve por­tra­yal of Cory. The power­ful images of the relent­less land­s­cape and the score by Warren Ellis and Nick Cave round out Sheridan‘s film and make it a film that sticks with you long after it‘s over.

Lars Tunçay | indiekino.de, Translation: Elinor Lewy

 


 
Credits:
USA 2017, 107 Min., engl. OmU

Regie: Taylor Sheridan
Drehbuch: Taylor Sheridan
Kamera: Ben Richardson
Schnitt: Gary Roach
Musik: Warren Ellis
mit: Jeremy Renner, Elizabeth Olsen, Gil Birmingham, Jon Bernthal
 
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